Tag Archives: Kraftwerk

2019 ➤ Ever wondered how Rusty Egan does what he does?

Blitz Club, New Romantics,Blitz Kids, Kraftwerk, Steve Strange, Rusty Egan, Visage, London Palladium

Egan onstage at the Palladium: video grab by Willy Billiams

◼ ONSTAGE AT THE LONDON PALLADIUM supporting Midge Ure’s tour last week, Blitz Club co-founder Rusty Egan gave a highly first-person history lesson about his early days while demonstrating his mixing talents at a deejay console.

Of 1979, he says: “I wasn’t really a deejay, I was a drummer, and I thought you can put one record on and you can put another record on at the same time and I thought I can do that, you don’t have to stop, I’d keep it going and I mixed the records together and started to enjoy it. Us suburban 19 to 25-year-olds with ‘no future’ in 1979 suddenly had some music that spoke to us. I was basically a fan and I am 40 years later still a fan of music.”

Here is half an hour of Egan’s stream of consciousness, doing what he does best, choosing good music and showing off. All spiced with his usual frankness, natch.

➢ Rusty Egan at Bandcamp

➢ History of the Blitz Kids and the birth of the New Romantics – a brisk history of who did what in 1979-80

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➤ Kerpow! Splat! Remix wizard Rusty unleashes all barrels on the music industry slackers

Rusty Egan, New Romantics, Blitz Kids, DJ, Kraftwerk, conference, Aston University, Soundcloud , Pop music, EDM, synthesiser,

Jan 2015: Rusty Egan ranting, sorry, lecturing at Aston University

◼ DID ASTON UNIVERSITY KNOW WHAT IT WAS DOING inviting deejay Rusty Egan to talk at an academic conference? The drummer and co-founder of the legendary 80s Blitz Club has dedicated his life to promoting electronic dance music so is uniquely qualified to spout on Germany’s seminal synth band at the world’s first scholarly gathering devoted to Kraftwerk and the Birth of Electronic Music. Conference organiser Dr Uwe Schütte claimed: “They are the most important band in the world in the way they changed music.”

Having been among their early disciples, Rusty was besotted enough to go hunting through Germany in the 70s in search of experiments in synthesised pop. His lifelong mission, he believes today, has shown “how Kraftwerk turned into Planet Rock turned into house music and what we know now as dance music.” He tells how he found the world’s first sampler in a German village called Wächtersbach, spent 12 hours making his first mash-up there and “never got paid for that record, not one dime”.

Rusty Egan, New Romantics, Blitz Kids, DJ, Kraftwerk, Pop music, EDM, synthesiser,

Sampling in Wächtersbach, 1979: ‪Rusty Egan‪ with Ian Tregoning making Wunderwerk with Franz Aumüller‬

Rusty made good with bands such as Rich Kids and Visage, in the face of the fat-cat indolence that prevailed in the torpid British music industry of the 70s, so last month’s platform enabled the now 57-year-old Rusty to settle a few scores by naming and shaming the rip-off merchants who, he says, have nicked his arrangements over the years and never paid a penny for them. By his own account, one of the guilty villains Rusty had paid £500 a day responded to his accusation saying: “Yeah but you should have kept the floppy disk.” Another lesson in the school of hard knocks.

The Aston “lecture” is described by one of the 200 delegates as “more of a comedy routine” and by Rusty himself as “Welcome to my insanity”. It’s now on Soundcloud for all to hear, and is typical of many an hour I’ve spent in Rusty’s kitchen trying to follow his uniquely entertaining stream-of-consciousness which randomly leaps from one story to the next while you work out that 20 years separates them. Early in his talk he says “I’m just mad on sound – it wasn’t a case of double paradiddle” illustrating his point with a beatbox break. So you have often to do a bit of Sherlockian deduction to finish his thoughts for him. His splenetic outbursts and ripe language (parental guidance advised) testify both to his indignation at the greed that characterises sections of the pop fraternity and to his own honesty, which even his friends suspect might be charming naivety.

Here’s his first rant:

In my experience record companies have never ever had any idea about creating music or creative people… I spent years not having any respect whatsoever for any guy in a satin jacket with Ace written on it with a briefcase with tour passes on it, long sideburns, dark glasses and a handlebar moustache, saying “Hi! I’m from your record label”. He was the last guy in the world you wanted to talk to and you had absolutely nothing you wanted to say to him.

VERDICTS BY RUSTY’S FANS AT FACEBOOK

Chi Ming Lai You will be in stitches.
Mat Mckenzie‪ This is a fantastic listen Rusty! ‬
Clive Pierce‪ Bravo… Absolutely riveting.‬
Anver Hanif‪ The knowledge and vision are superb.‬
Derek Quin‪ Rusty, you have been a massive influence on my music heritage. When I heard you speak at Aston it reinvigorated me.
Iris Peters‪ Great fun to listen to.
Jon Lowther‪ You and François Kevorkian defined the evolvement of electronica and the DJ. You have managed to maintain your passion, creativity and faith in an industry that fails. ‬
Mats From‪ I literally LOL’ed many times listening to thi‬s.

Rusty Egan, New Romantics, Blitz Kids, DJ, Kraftwerk, Pop music, EDM, synthesiser,

Kraftwerk’s pioneering drummer Wolfgang Flür: Rusty meets his hero in Dusseldorf more than 30 years after he first went in search of synth. . . “I was 22 when I met Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider and spent the evening explaining that future clubs will be playing music made by machines – what must they have thought!”

➢ Previously at Shapersofthe80s: 1980, One week in the private worlds of the new young when London blazes with creativity

➢ Previously at Shapersofthe80s: How three wizards met at the same crossroad in time – an inside scene-setter on the forces shaping the Swinging Eighties

RUSTY’S LATEST ELECTRONIC MIX

➢ Update from Spandau Ballet: Legendary deejay and friend of the band Rusty Egan has been confirmed as the support for all of the Soul Boys of the Western World tour UK & Ireland shows

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➤ Playlists to keep us foot-tapping into May

Basement Jaxx ,video,Back 2 The Wild

Back 2 The Wild: Click on pic to run video in a new window

➢ Bedazzling music video for the new Basement Jaxx single Back 2 The Wild is directed by Mat Maitland at Big Active & Natalia Stuyk. Salient points at Popjustice:

  1. Basement Jaxx are Felix Buxton and Simon Ratcliffe and they hail from London, England.
  2. They’ve collaborated with “everyone” from Kele Le Roc to JC Chasez to Dizzee Rascal to Robyn.
  3. If a song of theirs came on in a club it would not be inappropriate to have a bit of a dance.

➢ Double whammy: view the Wild video in super-high quality and visit their own online playlist at jaxxplayer

Dazed Digital ,May,Playlist ,Jessie Ware
➢ Dazed Digital has a vibey May playlist alongside its main feature post-punk stars, Savages. It says:
We’ve got a whole lot of Jeremih from his Cassie mixape collab to Shlohmo, new Gold Panda, Co La’s experimental single on Software, the first release from legendary London establishment Fabric’s Houndstooth label as well as an exclusive stream from Pedestrian’s new EP and more from our recently featured avant-garde electronic duo Diamond Version. Not to mention Jessie Ware.

Electricity Club,Kraftwerk, Mi-Soul, radio, Rusty Egan

Electricity Club Showman Rusty Egan: any kind of music so long as it’s electro

➢ Rusty Egan presents The Electricity Club Show every Friday 00:00 till 02:00 BST … Either take this picturesque catch-up route via the Electricity Club which champions the current electropop scene:

Eins-zwei-drei-vier… the fourth programme in the series Egan Presents The Electricity Club on Mi-Soul Radio can now be heard on catchup. The show starts with Kraftwerk and the other featured artists are fine examples of the Düsseldorf foursome’s legacy. These acts include Felix Da Housecat, Tiga & Zyntherius, Afrika Bambaataa, The Knife, Omd, Junkie Xl Featuring Dave Gahan, Mgmt, Simple Minds, Sin Cos Tan, Daft Punk, Inertia And The Presets.

➢ Or tune in live to Egan playing the best in electronic music at Mi-Soul on Fridays 00:00 till 02:00 BST

Mi-Soul is a soul music broadcast platform, providing everything soul everywhere – online, on mobile app and in due course on FM and digital, and any other future platform yet to be invented. Launched by the team responsible for creating Kiss FM in the 1990s, Mi-Soul continues to be supported by many of the original DJ team, augmented by high-profile presenters in every genre. Mi-Soul occupies a self-contained wing in the in the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust’s iconic building in Deptford, which was designed by the award-winning architect David Adjaye, and opened in 2008.

RUSTY’S SUMMER IN THE MED

❏ Rusty Egan says: “If you are in Cannes for the film festival I will be there on the Croisette at “Canvas” on the beach opposite Carlton Cannes hotel May 17–19 … then in Ibiza at Nassau Beach Bar with Steve Norman from Spandau Ballet on sax and percussion, from May to Sept every other Friday … I have been very busy writing and recording new music under the title Welcome To The Dancefloor and will be ready to release some stuff very soon. Visit Soundcloud to sample some.”

♫ Rusty Egan’s Playlist at the Blitz

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2011 ➤ Kraftwerk now: from machine music to visions in 3D

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Wallpaper magazine,october 2011, Kraftwerk, Ian Schrager, 3D video,Munich,concerts

3D cover by Kraftwerk: view with blue-red glasses supplied with the mag

❚ THE ELECTRONIC BAND KRAFTWERK exploded into the hippy haze of 1970 and filled the air with an insistent machine-made beat that spoke of the future. Indisputably, the German four-piece formulated a revolutionary kind of non-guitar music that reshaped the thinking of musicians as diverse as Bowie, Afrika Bambaataa, Coldplay, New Order, Johnny Marr, Franz Ferdinand and Radiohead. New genres such as house, synth-pop and techno were heralded by the 1974 hit album Autobahn.

Today, however, the pioneering Ralf Hütter (a Beach Boys fan) and his usually reclusive pals slip out of their comfort zone to become guest editors on the October issue of Wallpaper magazine, which features a new portfolio of Kraftwerk imagery in 3D. Oops!

Of necessity in print, they have chosen the vintage blue-red 3D technology from the 50s to create ten graphics as double-page spreads. Yet however hard you try to flatten the glossy and flexible magazine, the deep gulley down the middle beams out its own distracting reflections! (The images might well improve if viewed on the iPad edition.) Successful, they are not: 70s minimalism always teetered tinglingly on the brink of being boring, and creatively Kraftwerk’s bland graphic renderings of autobahn, calculator, PC, pills, robots, cyclists and the band themselves say nothing new. They wouldn’t guarantee a pass degree at a British art school. Disappointingly, the 3D effects grab you in only two illustrations — one of breaking glass, another of a car’s dashboard radio — prompting the message to Ralf, especially at the age of 65, that, as graphic artists, his band may have seen better days.

There’s much more value in a brief evaluation by the leading British designer Peter Saville of how Kraftwerk opened his horizons to the European cultural canon.  The advantages of the analogue era, he reasons convincingly, can be fully appreciated only now, from the perspective of the digital age.

➢ Electronic Sound Pictures — It could be that Kraftwerk’s specially developed multi-channel 3D video installation may offer a more immersive gallery experience. Fans will have to travel to Germany, to the Kunstbau at the Lenbachhaus, Munich, where the exhibition runs Oct 15–Nov 13. There’s also an accompanying book, Kraftwerk 3D, with 3D-glasses.

♫ First Kraftwerk concerts for two years will be held at the Alte Kongresshalle in Munich, October 12–13. Seats from £260 via Guardian Tickets.

♫ Kraftwerk’s Kling Klang Machine No 1 — 24-hour interactive music generator as an app for iPhone/iPad

➢ VIEW VIDEO: Kraftwerk and the Electronic revolution: Prism Films documentary, 2008

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SCHRAGER ANNOUNCES THE PEOPLE’S HOTEL

Ian Schrager, Public hotels, Wallpaper magazine, interview

Schrager: delivering a wake-up call

❏ Incidentally, the October issue of Wallpaper also interviews Ian Schrager, notorious partner behind Studio 54, the definitive New York nightclub of the 70s, who was jailed for income tax evasion. He later went on to invent the “boutique hotel” along with its “lobby socialising” and philosophy of “hotel as lifestyle” that has been ripped off by hoteliers across the globe.

At 65, with millions in the bank, he is about to launch his new Public hotel chain in Chicago. Business writer John Arlidge reports that “the master tastemaker senses the universe is turning on its axis again, just as it did when old-fashioned class divisions that ruled New York nightlife were swept away, enabling him to create Studio 54”. Schrager insists that there’s “a new simplicity” and “it’s structural”. He argues that many big hotel chains have failed to keep up with the consumer. The essential-services-only Public brand, he says, “will be an entirely new class of hotel that will be a big wake-up call to the industry”.

➢ Public Chicago begins previews on September 12

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