WELCOME ➤ TO THE SWINGING EIGHTIES

In 1980 a youth movement began reshaping Britain.
Its stars didn’t call themselves New Romantics, or the Blitz Kids – but other people did. This writer was there and these words and pictures tell the tale.

◼︎ As a decade, the 1970s spelt doom. British youth culture had been discredited by punk. A monumental recession followed the Labour government’s “winter of discontent”, threatening the prospect of no jobs for years ahead.
+++
Swinging 80s, London, history, blitz club, blitz kids, theblitzkids, theblitzclub, cult with no name, billy’s, gossip’s, nightclubs, fashion, pop music, 
steve strange, rusty egan, boy george, stephen jones, kim bowen, stephen linard, chris sullivan, robert elms, perry haines, princess julia, judi frankland, darla-jane gilroy,fiona dealey, jayne chilkes, derek ridgers, perry haines, terry jones,peter ashworth, lee sheldrick, michele clapton, myra, willy brown, helen robinson, stephane raynor, melissa caplan,Dinny Hall, Kate Garner, rachel auburn, richard ostell, Paul Bernstock, Dencil Williams, Darla Jane Gilroy, Simon Withers, Graham Smith, Graham Ball, christos tolera, sade adu, peter marilyn robinson, gaz mayall, midge ure, gary kemp, steve dagger,Denis O’Regan, andy polaris, john maybury, cerith Wyn Evans, iain webb, jeremy healy, david holah, stevie stewart, worried about the boy,Yet from this black hole burst an optimistic movement the press dubbed the New Romantics, based on a London club called the Blitz. Its soundtrack was a pounding synthesised electro-pop created for the dancefloor by a studio seven-piece called Visage, fronted by the ultimate poser, Steve Strange. But the live band who broke all the rules were five dandies with a preposterous name: Spandau Ballet.
+++
As the last of the Baby Boomers, the so-called Blitz Kids were concerned with much more than music. In 1980 they shook off teenage doubt to express all those talents the later Generation X would have to live up to — leadership, adaptability, negotiating skills, focus. Children of the age of mass TV, these can-doers excelled especially in visual awareness. They were the vanguard for a self-confident new class who were ready to enjoy the personal liberty and social mobility heralded by their parents in the 60s.
+++
For Britain, the Swinging 80s were a tumultuous period of social change when the young wrested many levers of power away from the over-40s. London became a creative powerhouse and its pop music and street fashion the toast of world capitals. All because a vast dance underground had been gagging for a very sociable revolution.

++++++++++++

“From now on, this will become the official history”
Verdict of a former Blitz Kid.

➢ THE MENU AT TOP leads you into this Aladdin’s Cave.
➢ THE BLOG POSTS on this front page report topical updates which also link to the background pages in the menu.

Below: View Blitz Club host Steve Strange in all his poser glory in the promo video for Fade to Grey (1982), also starring the club’s cloakroom girl, Julia Fodor, aka Princess

CLICK HERE to run the anthemic 80s video ♫ ♫ from Spandau Ballet and feel the chant:

nightlife, st moritz, club for heroes,le kilt, wag club, beat route,hacienda, cha-cha, holy city zoo, rum runner, camden palace, scala cinema, studio 21,crocs, le palace, white trash, fac51, Dirt Box, mud club, batcave, barbarella's, croc's, electro-pop, synth-pop, Chant No 1, kid creole, blue rondo, animal nightlife, visage, duran, depeche mode, ultravox, human league, gentry, ABC,soft cell, bolan,vince clarke, haysi, wham!, mclaren, heaven 17, yazoo, foxx, omd, bauhaus, phil oakey, jay strongman, Martyn Ware, martin fry ,altered images, 20th-century box, vivienne westwood, PX, axiom, body-map , foundry, sue clowes,demob, seditionaries, acme attractions, i-D, the face, new sounds new styles, Korniloff, andrew logan, kahn & bell, biddie & eve, toyah,

July 2, 1981: Shooting the video for Chant No 1 at Le Beat Route club in Soho, “down, down, pass the Talk of the Town”. Photograph © by Shapersofthe80s


❏ iPAD & TABLET & MOBILE USERS PLEASE NOTE — You are viewing only a very small selection of content from this wide-ranging website on the 1980s, not chosen by the author. To access fuller background features and topical updates please request PC version, or view Shapersofthe80s.com on a laptop or desktop computer.
➢ Click here to visit another random item every time you click

Advertisements

➤ Day Two of Terry Smith’s unseen photos inside the Blitz Club, exclusively at Shapers of the 80s

Nik & Trick Photo Services, Folkestone

“Double, double, toil and trouble” . . . Mandy d’Wit, Judith Frankland and Darla-Jane Gilroy await the casting call in case Mr Bowie drops in at the Blitz

➢ DAY TWO:
CLICK HERE TO VISIT OUR
GALLERY OF TEN MORE FAB IMAGES
OF THE BLITZ IN COLOUR

+++
A SURPRISING NEW CACHE of photographs of the Blitz Club in colour has been discovered from the spring of 1980 when TIME magazine asked British photographer Terry Smith to turn his lens on the nightlife posers at Covent Garden’s Blitz Club. They were to become feted as the New Romantics.

Tuesdays at the Blitz were all ritual. Everyone supped and danced on the same spot every week according to some invisible floorplan: downstairs near the bar stood the boys in the band (no make-up), their media and management by the stairs, credible punk legends such as Siouxsie Sioux along the bar, suburban wannabes beside the dancefloor.

Deep within the club, around Rusty Egan’s deejay booth, were the dedicated dancing feet, the white-faced shock troops, the fashionista elite – either there or near the cloakroom, ruled first by Julia Fodor (still going strong as deejay Princess Julia) and later by George O’Dowd (known today as ex-jailbird Boy George). Downstairs, the women’s loo was hijacked, naturally, by boys who would be girls. Upstairs on the railway banquettes might be respected alumni from an earlier London: film-maker Derek Jarman, artists Brian Clarke and Kevin Whitney, designers Antony Price and Zandra Rhodes…

➢ Previously at Shapers of the 80s:
1980, Just don’t call us New Romantics

FRONT PAGE

1980 ➤ Unseen photos inside the Blitz Club, exclusively at Shapers of the 80s

Nik & Trick Photo Services, Folkestone

Never before published: Steve Strange, co-founder with deejay Rusty Egan of the legendary Tuesday night at the Blitz in London

➢ DAY ONE:
CLICK HERE TO VISIT OUR
GALLERY OF TEN FAB IMAGES
OF THE BLITZ IN COLOUR

+++
AN ENORMOUS NEW CACHE of photographs of the Blitz Club in colour has been discovered from the spring of 1980 when the UK media started to take an interest in the Tuesday-night antics of the nightlife posers at Covent Garden’s Blitz Club. They were to become celebrated as the Blitz Kids by some and as New Romantics by others. Until this moment it has been easy to count the number of surviving professional pictures ever taken inside the Blitz during its 20-month life – all of them in black-and-white – and the total doesn’t even approach 100.

Now a call to Shapers of the 80s by the British photographer Terry Smith has unearthed probably 300 more images, commissioned by Time magazine. Many of them are in glorious colour, shedding extra light on the creativity of the night-owls who were in the throes of transforming the fashion and pop landscape of Britain in the Swinging 80s.

Shapers of the 80s today showcases the first of four batches of Terry’s pictures capturing the Blitz in colour, while a selling exhibition of his black-and-white images is preparing to open on 7 June in St Leonards-on-Sea.

➢ Terry Smith/Blitz and Pieces: Unseen Blitz Club Pictures
& 80s Bands runs 7 June–21 July 2018 at Lucy Bell Gallery,
St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex TN38 0EJ.
Preview 7 June, 6-8pm

Nik & Trick Photo Services, Folkestone

Never before published: Can you name these early New Romantics in the frilly-shirt posse at the Blitz in 1980?

FRONT PAGE

➤ V&A celebrates Steve Strange as the poser who put the pazazz into 80s nightlife

Blitz Kids, New Romantics, fashion, pop music, Swinging 80s, archive, nightlife, Steve Strange, Keith Lodwick, lunchtime lecture, V&A museum,

Giving this week’s V&A Lunchtime Lecture, May 2018: Curator Keith Lodwick in full flow. . . On-screen, Bowie’s Pierrot costume displayed in the V&A’s 2013 exhibition Bowie Is, with Steve Strange and other Blitz Kids pictured in Bowie’s Ashes to Ashes video in 1980

80S POP-STAR FRIENDS OF STEVE STRANGE turned out this week for a unique event at the V&A, the UK’s premier museum of art and design. The weekly Lunchtime Lecture was titled Steve Strange: From Blitz Club to Top of the Pops, and was delivered by Keith Lodwick, curator of theatre and performance, to an audience that included singer Clare Grogan, ABC’s Martin Fry and his wife Julie, Jennie Matthias from The Belle Stars and Fifi Russell from Yip Yip Coyote. Steve’s mother Gillian Harrington and his sister Tanya had travelled from Wales with PR Amanda Lloyd to attend the occasion with other family members.

The talk traced Strange’s flamboyant life from Wigan Casino, through glam-rock and punk, to hosting a landmark club-night at Billy’s jointly with deejay Rusty Egan, then another at the Blitz in 1979–80. This was the club-night that Band Aid organiser Midge Ure has described as “the beating heart of the electronic dance music that led the 1980s.”

Strange said of his strict admissions policy on the door: “I wanted creative-minded pioneers who looked like a walking piece of art.” Indeed, the club became Strange’s own catwalk for sporting outrageous outfits by both the leading designers of the day and London’s budding fashion students. Lodwick said: “He once told a journalist ‘I am on stage 24 hours a day’. Steve, who died in 2015, remains one of the enduring figures of the New Romantic period.”

Click any pic below to view larger in a slideshow

Lodwick reminded us of the pop pantheon Strange was joining at the museum when he extended “a huge thank-you to Gill, Tanya and Amanda for being a link in the chain that enabled the V&A to acquire Steve’s archive and costumes two years ago. The family donated mainly clothes from the 2000s – including designs by Vivienne Westwood and Alexander McQueen. Steve’s costumes join those worn by Sandie Shaw, the Beatles, Mick Jagger, Marc Bolan, Jimmy Page, Elton John and Adam Ant.”

We watched two video clips which underlined Strange’s obsession with image-making: the music video for his band Visage’s hit Fade to Grey in which he is transformed into a snake; and a documentary in which milliner Stephen Jones suggests that berets he made for both Strange and for the Princess of Wales coupled them “as a fashion force together”.

Lodwick concluded: “Steve’s legacy will live on for being central to re-energising the club scene in London – pushing forward electronic music, fashion, photography and pop.”

➢ Elsewhere at Shapersofthe80s: 1980, Strange days, strange nights – first report on the Blitz from Yours Truly

➢ Elsewhere at Shapersofthe80s:
2015, Original Blitz Kids say farewell to Steve Strange – read exclusive tributes to the King of the Posers

➢ Read the story of Spandau Ballet, the Blitz Kids and the birth of the New Romantics at The Observer, by Yours Truly

Blitz Kids, New Romantics, fashion, pop music, Swinging 80s, archive, nightlife, Steve Strange, Keith Lodwick, lunchtime lecture, V&A museum,

At this week’s V&A talk: Some of the women in Steve Strange’s life. . . From the left, sister Tanya Harrington, Monica Towner, Rachelle Boyle, Eve Ferrett, Kimbo at centre next to Steve’s mum Gill, Jennie (Belle Stars) Matthias (almost hidden at back), Wendy Tiger, Alison Graham, Amanda Lloyd far right

➢ Talks, lectures, conversations and pop-up events at the V&A

FRONT PAGE

➤ Zayn falls behind as UK popsters grow richer

Sunday Times Rich List , Zayn Malik,

Zayn Malik papped last week for SplashNewsOnline leaving Gigi’s New York apartment

ZAYN MALIK IS REVEALED TODAY as the poorest member of One Direction according to estimates calculated by the annual Sunday Times Rich List. Two years after the boybanders split, he seems to be feeling the cost of going solo, though at least he got back together this week with Gigi Hadid and wore his Looney Tunes T-shirt hoping to put a smile on both their faces. Among the pals in his former band Harry Styles is said now to be the richest of the five, worth £50m.

Mind you, Harry’s wealth pales beside Ed Sheeran at £80m, and Adele who is now estimated at £140m ($190m). In the week she turns 30, she becomes the top earner among the Top Dozen “under-30” pop stars in the UK and Ireland. The only other notables are Sam Smith at £24m, probably boosted by last year’s album, and Rita Ora who enters the list with £16m, presumably boosted by her deals with Adidas, DKNY and other brands.

Richest musicians under 30

Sunday Times Rich List , Adele, musicians, under 30

Writing about broader shifts in wealth within society, Robert Watts, who compiles the Sunday Times Rich List, said: “Streaming services, the internet and income from endorsements are helping today’s young musicians build an international following – and with it their fortunes – far quicker than the older rockers. Some of the biggest risers [proportionately] over the past year have been amongst younger acts such as Ed Sheeran, Adele and Calvin Harris.”

Sunday Times Rich List , Adele,

Adele wowing them at last year’s Grammys. (Photo Kevin Winter/Getty)

Sheeran’s fortune leapt by 54% this year, while Adele’s rose by 12%. She is reported saying “money is of little interest” and has rejected offers of celebrity endorsement. The chart-savvy Scottish deejay and crossover producer Harris (worth £140m, up 17%) charges the mind-boggling sum of £370,000 whenever he spins discs in Las Vegas “dozens of times a year” and “seven-figure fees” when playing in Tokyo! Consequently Harris, now aged 34, has topped the Forbes list of the world’s highest-paid deejays for five consecutive years. Eat yer heart out, Rusty Egan!

The UK’s Top 40 musical wrinklies are led as usual by Paul McCartney, at £820m when valued alongside his wife Nancy Shevell, which makes him the richest musician in the history of the Rich List. He has also benefited from the deal that made The Beatles’ 13 albums available on streaming services in 2015. After him come Andrew Lloyd-Webber £740m, Elton John £300m, Mick Jagger £260m and Keith Richards £245m. Ker-ching! Only three performers survive into this year’s list from the Swinging 80s (at a stretch): Gary Barlow (£80m) of Take That, who formed in 1989; Irish singer-songwriter Enya (£104m); and Ozzy Osbourne (£140m), the heavy metallist fired as vocalist from Black Sabbath, who started his solo career in 1980 and released 11 studio albums.

* Valuations of musicians’ wealth for the Sunday Times are based on research by Cliff Dane, author of the Rock Accounts books.

➢ Full lists of the UK’s richest musicians at Music Week

➢ The top 25 bigwigs in UK fashion are worth a staggering £48bn, from the Weston family (Primark, Selfridges, Brown Thomas) to Leon Max – listed at Tatler

➢ Previously at Shapersofthe80s: 2010 Rich List puts George Michael top of the pop stars from the un-lucrative 80s

FRONT PAGE

➤ Glimpses into the minds of Bowie and his photographer

David Bowie ,Barrie Wentzell,Lucy Bell gallery , photography, limited edition, rock music,exhibition, collecting

David Bowie shot in 1972: Six playful frames from the 20 on the 20×24-inch sheet by Barrie Wentzell / RockArchive in the Contacts exhibition


THE CONTACTS EXHIBITION shows off a unique collection of never before seen contact sheets by some of the world’s greatest music photographers. The contact sheet is the photographer’s first look at what they have captured on camera, printed directly from the negatives or roll of film in the era before digital. One sheet might contain 30 shots taken in succession and thus gives an intimate glimpse into a photographer’s working process and editing choices while also sharing candid moments when an off-guard star is caught larking about.

The exhibition makes a trip worthwhile to St Leonards on Sea in East Sussex where all the prints at the Lucy Bell gallery are for sale. We see enlarged contact sequences of David Bowie, Bob Dylan, Bob Marley, Oasis, Joy Division, Iggy Pop, Tom Waits taken by renowned photographers such as Jill Furmanovsky, Barrie Wentzell, Don Hunstein, Michael Putland, Carinthia West, Michael Putland, Andrew Catlin, Matt Anker, Colin N Purvor and Brian Duffy.

➢ Contacts runs at the Lucy Bell gallery in St Leonards on Sea until 29 May 2018

➢ Bob Marley, Björk and David Bowie as you’ve never seen them – reviewed by Sam Wolfson in The Guardian

FRONT PAGE