Tag Archives: Tributes

1955–2014 ➤ Frankie Knuckles, the Godfather of House Music, is gone

Frankie Knuckles,house music, tributes, deejay, Chicago,

2012: an Evening with Frankie Knuckles at Smart Bar, Chicago (© Tasya Menaker). His final live deejay set was at Ministry of Sound in London on Saturday. He had been scheduled to return to the UK for shows at Gatecrasher in Birmingham and The Arches in Glasgow later this month


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➢ Today’s tribute to Frankie Knuckles at Rolling Stone,
by Michaelangelo Matos:

Nobody can agree on who invented the blues or birthed rock & roll, but there is no question that house music came from Frankie Knuckles, who died Monday afternoon of as-yet-undisclosed causes at age 59. One of the 80s and 90s’ most prolific house music producers and remixers, Knuckles is, hands down, one of the dozen most important deejays of all time.

 Chicago, Warehouse,clubbing

The Chicago block where the Warehouse stood

At his Chicago clubs the Warehouse (1977-82) and Power Plant (1983-85), Knuckles’ marathon sets, typically featuring his own extended edits of a wide selection of tracks from disco to post-punk, R&B to synth-heavy Eurodisco, laid the groundwork for electronic dance music culture — all of it.

Knuckles made an abundant number of dance classics, including early Jamie Principle collaborations Your Love (1986) and Baby Wants to Ride (1987); Tears (1989), with Satoshi Tomiiee and Robert Owens; The Whistle Song (1991); and his remixes of Chaka Khan’s Ain’t Nobody (1989), Sounds of Blackness’s The Pressure (1992), and Hercules and Love Affair’s Blind (2008) … / Continued at Rolling Stone

Frankie Knuckles Day, Chicago, Barack Obama

August 25, 2004: declared Frankie Knuckles Day in Chicago by the then-senator Barack Obama

Barack Obama, Frankie Knuckles, condolence

Update April 17, 2014: letter of condolence from the Obamas

➢ Knuckles, the man I knew, by Clive Morgan in the Daily Telegraph

➢ Priest of the dancefloor, by Alexis Petridis in The Guardian

tom johnston, frankie knuckles, cartoon

VIDEO INTERVIEW IN LONDON 2012

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➤ RIP Lou Reed… Today we lost another legend

Lou Reed, Velvet Underground

Lou Reed on his bare-bones guitar style: “One chord is fine. Two chords are pushing it. Three chords and you’re into jazz”

“He was a master” – David Bowie today
on his old friend

➢ Lou Reed, Velvet Underground leader and rock pioneer
who helped shape nearly fifty years of rock music
– Rolling Stone tribute, Oct 27:

After splitting with the Velvets in 1970, Reed traveled to England and, in characteristically paradoxical fashion, recorded a solo debut backed by members of the progressive-rock band Yes. But it was his next album, 1972’s Transformer, produced by Reed-disciple David Bowie, that pushed him beyond cult status into genuine rock stardom. Walk On the Wild Side, a loving yet unsentimental evocation of Warhol’s Factory scene, became a radio hit (despite its allusions to oral sex) and Satellite of Love was covered by U2 and others. Reed spent the Seventies defying expectations almost as a kind of sport. 1973’s Berlin was brutal literary bombast while 1974’s Sally Can’t Dance had soul horns and flashy guitar. In 1975 he released Metal Machine Music, a seething all-noise experiment his label RCA marketed as avant-garde classic music, while 1978’s banter-heavy live album Take No Prisoners was a kind of comedy record in which Reed went on wild tangents and savaged rock critics by name… / Continued at Rolling Stone

“Lou Reed… said that the first Velvet Underground
record sold 30,000 copies in the first five years.
But that was such an important record for
so many people, I think everyone who bought one
started a band!” – Brian Eno, 1982

➢ Alexis Petridis says Reed was capable of writing perfect pop songs – in Monday’s Guardian:

Their 1967 debut The Velvet Underground And Nico is the single most influential album in rock history. Certainly, it’s hard to think of another record that altered the sound and vocabulary of rock so dramatically, that shifted its parameters so far at a stroke. Vast tranches of subsequent pop music exist entirely in its shadow: it’s possible that glam rock, punk, and everything that comes loosely bracketed under the terms indie and alt-rock might have happened without it, but it’s hard to see how…

… the four gruelling songs that make up side two of his 1973 concept album Berlin are quite astonishing expressions of coldness and cruelty… [but] he could write songs that were impossibly moving, that spoke of a tenderness and sensitivity: the lambent, peerless Pale Blue Eyes; Halloween Parade’s heartbreaking lament for New York’s gay community, devastated by Aids; his meditation on death, Magic And Loss… / Continued at Guardian Online

➢ Reed’s own website with his last portrait
taken earlier this month

Click any pic to launch carousel

➢ In this firey Telegraph interview from 2011, Reed and Metallica defended their controversial collaboration album Lulu to Neil McCormick

➢ “Lou Reed is to 1970s New York as the poet Baudelaire was to 1850s Paris” – ft.com

➢ Wide-ranging 1995 conversation between novelist Paul Auster and Lou Reed, who reveals his rarely seen good-humoured side – online at Dazed & Confused

SINGING ABOUT WARHOL ON TRANSFORMER

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➢ Punk old-timer Legs McNeil on how, despite acting like a grump, the Velvet Underground front man was beloved – The Daily Beast

➢ “Second only to Bob Dylan in his impact on rock and roll’s development” – Variety

Lou Reed, Mick Rock,photography

Lou Reed and his favourite British photographer Mick Rock in 1975

➢ Lou Reed and Mick Rock were a great double act: The Quietus talks to them about their enduring relationship and a new book of photos, 2013

➢ Mick Rock talks to Galore magazine about the limited edition of Transformer, his photobook of Lou Reed pix from 1972 to 1980 (Genesis Publications)

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➤ Farewell Trevor the mutton-chopped Spider from Mars

Ziggy Stardust, Spiders from Mars,plaque, Woody Woodmansey, Trevor Bolder ,

March 27, 2012: Spiders Mick Woody Woodmansey and Trevor Bolder being interviewed at the unveiling of the plaque to Ziggy Stardust in Heddon Street, London. Photo © Shapersofthe80s

➢ Trevor Bolder dead at 62 Long-time Uriah Heep bassist and Spiders From Mars icon Trevor Bolder has died of cancer at the age of 62, it’s been confirmed. Bolder joined David Bowie’s backing band in 1971, alongside guitarist Mick Ronson – with whom he’d played in The Rats – and drummer Woody Woodmansey… / Continued at Classic Rock

David Bowie tonight paid his own tribute:
“Trevor was a wonderful musician and a major inspiration for whichever band he was working with. But he was foremostly a tremendous guy, a great man.”

➢ A very frank Trevor Bolder interview at Let It Rock, 2003
Q: How did you, hailing not from London, arrive at that John Peel session?
A: Mick Ronson and Woody [Woodmansey] had played on The Man Who Sold The World album with David Bowie. They did that album with him and then left – they didn’t want to play with Bowie any more – so they came up to Hull, where I joined them, and we played for about six months as a band. And Bowie rang up one day and asked if we’d go down and do this John Peel show with him, cause he needed a band. So we said, “OK, we’ll come down and do that”. That’s basically how it all started.

Ziggy Stardust, David Bowie,Spiders from Mars,Trevor Bolder

Playing bass with Bowie, 1973: Bolder sporting his fantastical mutton-chop whiskers

➢ Trevor Bolder’s life at NNDB
Gender: Male
Religion: Scientology
Race or Ethnicity: White
Sexual orientation: Straight
Occupation: Bassist
Nationality: England
Executive summary: Uriah Heap bassist

Yet another native of Hull, Yorkhire, to become important to the London music scene during the 1970s, Trevor Bolder was born to a strongly music-oriented family, taking up both cornet and trumpet at the age of nine and performing with local brass bands during his adolescence. In his teens he took the direction followed by many other young males of his generation and switched to the guitar, at which time he formed The Chicago Star Blues Band with his brother. Stints in other Hull-based bands like Jelly Roll and Flesh came later, with Bolder eventually trading in his guitar for an electric bass; meanwhile, food was kept on the table through a series of day jobs that ranged from hairdresser to piano tuner.

In 1970 he received an invitation from fellow Hull native Mick Ronson to come to London and join Ronno – an outfit that had been active earlier in the year as The Hype, and which had served as a backing band for vocalist David Bowie. Ronno only managed one single (1971, Fourth Hour of My Sleep) before poor response prompted Vertigo, the band’s label, to abandon them; not long afterwards, however, Bowie enlisted most of the line-up (Ronson, Bolder and drummer Woody Woodmansey) for his fourth album Hunky Dory (1971). Thus the way was paved for the creation of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars in 1972, a highly theatrical concept band that would launch Bowie and his bandmates into international stardom… / Continued at NNDB

Ziggy Stardust,mime, David Bowie,Spiders from Mars,Trevor Bolder

Costumed by Kansai Yamamoto,1973: Bassist Bolder looking deeply uncomfortable in Japanese garb as his master Bowie goes into his Marcel Marceau mime routine

➢ “It is with great sadness that Uriah Heep announce the passing of our friend the amazing Trevor Bolder”

Trevor Bolder , Uriah Heep

Trevor Bolder onstage with Uriah Heep, 2011: He was due to play the Donington Park Download festival with Heep in June

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2013 ➤ RIP Milo O’Shea: to some Leopold Bloom, to us Durand Durand

O’Shea as the mad scientist Durand Durand in Barbarella, a 41st-century sex-romp made in1968: this was the character who inspired the name of Simon Le Bon’s pop group Duran Duran. Here he is seen at the keyboard of his Excessive Machine, trying to destroy Jane Fonda with simulated lust waves. © Dino de Laurentiis Cinematografica

O’Shea as the mad scientist Dr Durand Durand in Barbarella, a 41st-century sex-romp made in1968: this was the character who inspired the name of Nick Rhodes’s pop group Duran Duran. Here the Doctor is seen at the keyboard of his orgasmatron which he called the Excessive Machine, trying to destroy Jane Fonda with simulated waves of lust. © Dino de Laurentiis Cinematografica

O’Shea as Leopold Bloom: with Barbara Jefford as Molly Bloom in Ulysses (1967). Photograph: Ronald Grant Archive

O’Shea as Leopold Bloom: with Barbara Jefford as Molly Bloom in Joseph Strick’s Ulysses (1967). Photograph: Ronald Grant Archive

➢ Irish stage and screen character actor who appeared in Barbarella, Ulysses, Loot, Theatre of Blood – Michael Coveney tribute at the Guardian, April 3

For a performer of such fame and versatility, the distinguished Irish character actor Milo O’Shea, who has died aged 86, is not associated with any role in particular, or indeed any clutch of them. He was chiefly associated with his own expressive dark eyes, bushy eyebrows, outstanding mimetic talents and distinctive Dublin brogue.

His impish presence irradiated countless fine movies – including Joseph Strick’s Ulysses (1967), Roger Vadim’s Barbarella (1968) and Sidney Lumet’s The Verdict (1982) – and many top-drawer American television series, from Cheers, The Golden Girls and Frasier, right through to The West Wing (2003-04), in which he played the chief justice Roy Ashland… / Continued at Guardian online

O'Shea as chief justice Ashland in The West Wing 2003-04. © NBCU Photo Bank

O’Shea as chief justice Ashland in The West Wing 2003-04. © NBCU Photo Bank

O’Shea as Friar Laurence in Zeffirelli’s Romeo and Juliet, 1968: with Leonard Whiting and Olivia Hussey

O’Shea as Friar Laurence in Zeffirelli’s Romeo and Juliet, 1968: with Leonard Whiting and Olivia Hussey

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1938–2012 ➤ Robert Hughes: the greatest art critic of our time

“I don’t think there’s ever been such a rush towards insignificance in the name of the historical future as we’ve seen in the last 15 years.” — Robert Hughes concluding his TV series The Shock of the New in 1980

➢ War: the 20th-century way to build a new world — Robert Hughes laments the effects of war in The Shock of The New

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