Tag Archives: Paris

➤ “Just a Friday night at a rock show,” by a survivor

Bataclan, terrorism, Paris

Isobel’s T-shirt

➢ By Isobel Bowdery at Facebook, 14 Nov 2015;

You never think it will happen to you. It was just a Friday night at a rock show. The atmosphere was so happy and everyone was dancing and smiling. And then when the men came through the front entrance and began the shooting, we naively believed it was all part of the show.

It wasn’t just a terrorist attack, it was a massacre. Dozens of people were shot right in front of me. Pools of blood filled the floor. Cries of grown men who held their girlfriends’ dead bodies pierced the small music venue. Futures demolished, families heartbroken, in an instant.

Shocked and alone, I pretended to be dead for over an hour, lying among people who could see their loved ones motionless. Holding my breath, trying to not move, not cry – not giving those men the fear they longed to see. I was incredibly lucky to survive. But so many didn’t. The people who had been there for the exact same reasons as I – to have a fun Friday night – were innocent.

This world is cruel. And acts like this are suppose to highlight the depravity of humans and the images of those men circling us like vultures will haunt me for the rest of my life. The way they meticulously aimed and shot people around the standing area I was in the centre of without any consideration for human life. It didn’t feel real. I expected any moment for someone to say it was just a nightmare.

Bataclan, Paris,Isobel Bowdery, survivor, terrorism, shootings ,

Isobel Bowdery: survivor of the terrorist shootings at last night’s Bataclan concert in Paris

But being a survivor of this horror lets me shed light on the heroes. To the man who reassured me and put his life on line to try and cover my brain whilst I whimpered, to the couple whose last words of love kept me believing the good in the world, to the police who succeded in rescuing hundreds of people, to the complete strangers who picked me up from the road and consoled me during the 45 minutes I truly believed the boy I loved was dead, to the injured man who I had mistaken for him and then on my recognition that he was not Amaury, held me and told me everything was going to be fine despite being all alone and scared himself, to the woman who opened her doors to the survivors, to the friend who offered me shelter and went out to buy new clothes so I wouldn’t have to wear this blood stained top, to all of you who have sent caring messages of support – you make me believe this world has the potential to be better. To never let this happen again.

But most of this is to the 80 people who were murdered inside that venue, who weren’t as lucky, who didn’t get to wake up today and to all the pain that their friends and families are going through. I am so sorry. There’s nothing that will fix the pain. I feel privileged to be there for their last breaths. And truly believing that I would join them, I promise that their last thoughts were not on the animals who caused all this. It was thinking of the people they loved. As I lay down in the blood of strangers and waiting for my bullet to end my mere 22 years, I envisioned every face that I have ever loved and whispered I love you, over and over again, reflecting on the highlights of my life. Wishing that those I love knew just how much, wishing that they knew that no matter what happened to me, to keep believing in the good in people. To not let those men win.

Last night, the lives of many were for ever changed and it is up to us to be better people. To live lives that the innocent victims of this tragedy dreamt about but sadly will now never be able to fulfil. RIP angels. You will never be forgotten.

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30 years ago ➤ The day Vivienne and Malcolm realised the end was nigh

End of the world: The last public appearance together by Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood, Oct 17, 1983. As they take the applause for their Paris show, a bitter battle for control of the Worlds End label is raging behind the scenes. Picture © by Shapersofthe80s

End of the world 30 years ago: The last public appearance together by Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood, Oct 17, 1983. As they take the applause for their Paris show, a bitter battle for control of the Worlds End label is raging behind the scenes. Photographed © by Shapersofthe80s

➢ My Evening Standard exclusive breaks the news
of a parting of the ways – read it inside Shapersofthe80s

First published in the Evening Standard, Nov 4, 1983

First published in the Evening Standard, Nov 4, 1983

Vivienne Westwood, fashion, retail

Guess who’s still in business today: Vivienne Westwood as triumphant tribal queen in a new portrait posted only this week at Facebook

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2013 ➤ Paris RTW throws up pure anarchy from London in the 80s

“The black-and-whiteness, the kilt over drop-crotch leggings, suspenders on oversize checked silk trousers, gender neutrality — shades of Bodymap in the eighties?”

◼ These stunning pix show shades of more than Bodymap in the 80s – shades also of Westwood, Linard and Galliano. Just read the sheer depth and breadth of brilliant vision expressed this week by Deborah and Priscilla Royer’s wittily titled Pièce d’anarchive presentation …

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➢ For stylecom Tim Blanks reports on this sensational RTW collection which could have come straight down the London catwalks 30 years ago!

French art students learn about Jean Pierre Raynaud at school. He was the conceptualist who spent 25 years building his house, only to decide it was too perfect and, in 1993, tear it to bits. Center stage at Deborah and Priscilla Royer’s laser-sharp presentation for Pièce d’anarchive was a major piece by Raynaud: 64 stainless-steel buckets filled with rubble from his demolition job, installed by the artist himself…

The Royers remodeled sporty athleticism, one of the big stories for Spring 2014, with their own knitwear expertise. “Fusing French craftsmanship with street influences,” said Deborah, “less archive, more anarchy”. The black-and-whiteness, the kilt over drop-crotch leggings, suspenders on oversize checked silk trousers, gender neutrality — shades of Bodymap in the eighties? OK, grant the girls that flicker of fashion anarchy, but otherwise, the linear precision of the clothes was less about letting go, more about complete control of the body, with pieces in substantial technical yarns that celebrated the fit form… / Continued at style.com

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➤ Searching for that last kiss
 on the third anniversary of McLaren’s death

My lips are open wide
Stretched so far apart
Searching for that last kiss
With my hands pressed tight to my heart

A thousand hungry flowers
Loving you for hours and hours
Soon smothers me so tenderly

A thousand kisses say goodbye
And then they say you’ll never die
A lonely fanfare blew
And then they sing to you

A thousand kisses say goodbye
And then they say you’ll never die
A lonely fanfare blew
And then they sing to you

– Revenge of the Flowers
© Chrysalis Music Group, Sony/ATV Music Publishing

Revenge of the Flowers,Malcolm McLaren, Françoise Hardy, video,album, Paris,◼ MALCOLM McLAREN died three years ago today and is remembered on his website by his partner Young Kim with these lyrics from Revenge of the Flowers, a track from the concept album Paris… In 1994, he recorded his own music and words through performances by such prominent French stars as Françoise Hardy, seen above in the Duncan Ward video of 1995 singing Revenge of the Flowers. The album was essentially a love letter to the city he was to make a home in his final years. At AllMusic Stephen Thomas Erlewine’s verdict is: “The heavily orchestrated cabaret jazz backdrops tend to accentuate the sleaziness of McLaren’s words. And that’s what makes the record perversely fascinating: every element is so poorly conceived and executed that the entire thing appears to be an intentional joke.”

Punk, From Chaos To Couture ,New York, Metropolitan Museum , exhibition

A Chanel punk-inspired look from 2011. Photo © David Sims courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

➢ Punk: From Chaos To Couture is the next Costume Institute exhibition at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, May 9–Aug 14 – British photographer Nick Knight is the creative consultant on a show that examines punk’s impact on high fashion from its birth in the early 1970s, including a Couturier Situationists section dedicated to Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood. All presented as an immersive multimedia, multisensory experience, the clothes will be animated with period music videos and soundscaping audio techniques. Wow.

UPDATE APRIL 2013: A DEATH MASK FOR MALCY

Malcolm McLaren, Highgate Cemetery, bronze, death mask , Nick Reynolds

McLaren bronze death mask by Nick Reynolds

McLaren’s ostentatious memorial in Highgate Cemetery, unveiled this month, is inscribed “Better a spectacular failure than a benign success”. The black granite headstone holds a bronze death mask commissioned from Nick Reynolds, the sculptor, harmonica player and former Royal Navy diver, who has captured McLaren’s “trademark sneer”. Update 2017, in a Radio 4 programme about his trade the sculptor claimed: “I didn’t put that on. He actually had the sneer in death. Defiant to the end. . . I did meet McLaren when he was alive and asked him if I could do a cast of his head and he in his own inimitable style told me to F– O–.” Reynolds added: “I did him in the end.”

Reynolds has also cast masks of his own father the Great Train Robber Bruce Reynolds, fellow robber Ronnie Biggs, gambler George “Taters” Chatham, journalist William Rees-Mogg, actor Peter O’Toole and composer Pat Castange. He also owns the death masks of many famous people from Ned Kelly and Napoleon to director Ken Russell. They decorate every wall in his flat.

➢ 2010, What a tear-jerker! McLaren mashes up his own musical ‘Requiem to Myself’ – exclusive to Shapers of the 80s

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2012 ➤ Style.com nods to Sade Adu’s fashion legacy

Sade Adu, singer, Beauty Icon ,fashion,Style dotcom,Melissa Caplan,Blitz Kids, US invasion,Demob , Steve Strange, Le Palace , Paris, 1981
❚ “JEAN PAUL GAULTIER SENT SADE LOOK-ALIKES down his Spring-Summer runway last month, and Olivier Rousteing borrowed her signature hoops and shoulder pads for his Balmain collection. The up-and-coming British soul star Jessie Ware owes everything to Sade, down to her painted lips and single braid.” So says the prestige fashion website Style.com today in its Beauty Icon spot. “As it turns out, fashion has played no small role in the life of Helen Folasade Adu,” it adds, while sketching her distinctive contribution to music and style.

Best of all, Style.com includes a classic early shot of Sade taken by Shapersofthe80s, long before she became a singer, when she modelled clothes by Melissa Caplan in New York during the now legendary invasion of America by London’s trend-setting Blitz Kids in 1981. Catch our eye-witness report inside:

1981 — Pix of Sade’s Demob designs during the first
Blitz invasion of the US

Jean Paul Gautier, Spring Summer 2013,Sade Adu, fashion,pop music

Jean Paul Gaultier’s take on the Sade style of ponytail and hoop earrings: one of many 80s tributes in his Spring Summer 2013 runway show last month in Paris

1982 — Pix of Sade helping backstage during Steve Strange’s fashion show in Paris

2010 — Shapersofthe80s finds comeback Shard comfy
as ‘Auntie Sade’

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