Category Archives: Media

2009 till now ➤ Archive of posts at Shapersofthe80s

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2013 ➤ Bobby Womack’s last interview with Old School Robbie

radio, soul music,Bobby Womack,Robbie Vincent, Jazz FM,interview

Jan 2013: soul legend Bobby Womack meets UK deejay Robbie Vincent at Jazz FM

➢ At Facebook, the legendary UK soul deejay Robbie Vincent writes: We have lost a real Soul Brother in Bobby Womack, one of the greatest. We go back a long time and he used to call me Old School Robbie. Respect to an amazing and talented musician and a real gentleman. At this time I wish I was on air to pay tribute… Delighted to say you can hear again my last interview with Bobby Womack at Mixcloud. Thanks to Mike Vitti for his help in making it possible for you to share words and music from our Soul Brother. He was in fine form too.

When Robbie met Bobby... Part 1 of Robbie Vincent's interview with Bobby Womack - January 2013 by Robbievincent on Mixcloud

➢ When Robbie met Bobby… Robbie Vincent’s Essential Rhythms interview with the legendary Bobby Womack on Jazz FM in January 2013, in three parts – James Brown, hiding from the tax man, pretending to be blind, Sam Cooke, Wilson Picket, great music, this thing has got the lot.

➢ Soul legend Bobby Womack dead at 70 – Rolling Stone obituary: Womack was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2009. ‘My very first thought was — I wish I could call Sam Cooke and share this moment with him,’ Womack said. ‘This is just about as exciting to me as being able to see Barack Obama become the first black President of the United States of America.

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➤ Glasgow art school fire appeal launched by Edinburgh College of Art

Glasgow School of Art, fire, Charles Rennie Mackintosh,

Yesterday’s fire at Glasgow School of Art

Glasgow School of Art, fire, Charles Rennie Mackintosh,

Yesterday’s fire at Glasgow School of Art: snapped by Tweeter xdxxnx

Glasgow School of Art, fire, Charles Rennie Mackintosh,

Mackintosh was a 28-year-old junior draughtsman when he drew up plans for GSA, recently voted the best building of the past 175 years

➢ Firefighters battled yesterday to rescue Glasgow School of Art from a blaze that engulfed its iconic Charles Rennie Mackintosh-designed building:
Scottish Fire and Rescue Service crews are continuing work to fully extinguish the fire and save artworks. The fire service said more than 90% of the structure was viable and they had protected up to 70% of the contents… / See video at BBC News

➢ Saturday update by the GSA media centre:
Bad news first is that we have lost the iconic and unique Mackintosh library. This is an enormous blow and we are understandably devastated… Mackintosh was not famous for working in precious materials. It was his vision that was precious and we are confident that we can recreate what was lost as faithfully as possible.

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➢ GSA fire appeal launched by Edinburgh College of Art:
A report on BBC News at Ten carries footage but no further developments. The windows of the hen run are clearly badly damaged with mullions and transoms destroyed in places, but how badly will the Library have been damaged? … / Continued at GSA website

➢ The Glasgow School of Art photo gallery at Flickr

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➤ 40 years on from Abba, Austria fields a bearded drag artist for Eurovision

Tom Neuwirth, Conchita Wurst, Eurovision , sexuality, drag

Conchita aka Tom: a bearded lady in the Eurovision Song Contest in Copenhagen

❚ THE PRIVATE PERSON TOM NEUWIRTH was born in Austria in 1988 and the art personality Conchita Wurst in 2011, the same year Tom graduated from the Graz School of Fashion. In last night’s second semi-final of the Eurovision Song Contest, the bearded drag performer Conchita won her place to represent Austria in Saturday’s final by singing what could pass gloriously as a Bond theme, Rise Like a Phoenix.

The homophobic backlash could have been predicted from conservative nations such as Ukraine, Belarus and Russia where petitions have urged her removal from the competition. Russian politician Vitaly Milonov called her a “pervert” adding: “It is not normal but a person cannot be punished in Russia for being homosexual, or to live with a dog, with a horse, with a sheep, whatever.”

Ms Wurst answered her critics: “I can only say ‘Thank you for your attention’. If this is only about me and my person, I can live with it. I’m just a singer in a fabulous dress, with great hair and a beard.

“I created this bearded lady to show the world that you can do whatever you want,” she said at a press conference in Copenhagen. Although the German word Wurst routinely means “sausage”, its idiomatic meaning is “irrelevant” so signalling that Conchita’s sexuality is a non-issue. She makes a statement for tolerance and acceptance while 25-year-old Tom’s motto is: “Be the best version of yourself rather than a bad copy of someone else.”

➢ Conchita interviewed by Brendan O’Connor on the Irish Saturday Night Show

➢ Live video meet and greet with Conchita Wurst in Copenhagen: “Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss you’ll land among the stars. That’s the way I live”

➢ Ich will einen Grammy” – Conchita wird von deutschem Fernsehen auf dem roten Stuhl interviewt: “Ich bin in Kolumbien geboren, am Bogota. Ich wurde genannt meine Grossmutter, Conchita. Und Wurst, bei mein Vater natürlich Alfred Knack von Wurst”

BEFORE: TOM NEUWIRTH …

… AFTER: CONCHITA WURST

HOT UPDATE MAY 10 – CONCHITA WINS!!!

Tom Neuwirth, Conchita Wurst, Eurovision , sexuality

Conchita Wurst victorious: she was second favourite to win going into the contest (PA)

➢ BBC News reports: Austrian drag act Conchita Wurst has been crowned the winner of the 59th Eurovision Song Contest: “The singer, whose real name is Tom Neuwirth, won with the song Rise Like a Phoenix, collecting 290 points. The Netherlands finished second with 238 points, with Sweden in third place with 218 points. Wurst had been the second favourite to win behind Sweden going in to the competition, with many predicting the act could be too divisive among voters. However she was the clear winner, with her victory announced after 34 of the 37 countries had submitted their scores.”

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➤ Mad man dies after skewering the American Dream and bequeathing us Alfred E Neuman

Al Feldstein , Mad magazine, Alfred E Neuman , comics, satire, American Dream,

Al Feldstein in 1972 © Photograph by Jerry Mosey/Associated Press

❚ THE CREATIVE GIANT WHO EDITED America’s most influential satirical magazine has died. From 1956 Al Feldstein took the circulation of Mad from 400,000 to a peak of 2,850,000, and spent 29 years not only making a young generation laugh but fearlessly challenging sacred cows and urging scepticism about the American Dream and its furshlugginer advocates (a not-Yiddish word invented for the purpose). One issue a few years ago contained contributions from ten Pulitzer-winning cartoonists. In creating an American institution, Feldstein paved the way for National Lampoon, Saturday Night Live, The Simpsons, South Park, The Onion – and for Britain’s Viz magazine, according to its editor Graham Dury, creator of the Fat Slags…

Al Feldstein , Mad magazine, Alfred E Neuman ,

Mad magazine’s trademark, the grinning gap-toothed Alfred E. Neuman created by Feldstein: as an American icon, he is the face of every cover star

➢ The soul of Mad magazine dies at 88 –
by Bruce Weber in the New York Times:

The founding editor, Harvey Kurtzman, established its well-informed irreverence, but Al Feldstein gave Mad its identity as a smart-alecky, sniggering and indisputably clever spitball-shooter of a publication with a scattershot look, dominated by gifted cartoonists of wildly differing styles.

In his second issue, Mr Feldstein seized on a character who had appeared only marginally in the magazine — a freckled, gaptoothed, big-eared, glazed-looking young man — and put his image on the cover, identifying him as a write-in candidate for president campaigning under the slogan “What, me worry?”
At first he went by Mel Haney, Melvin Cowznofski and other names. But when the December 1956 issue, No 30, identified him as Alfred E. Neuman, the name stuck.

He became the magazine’s perennial cover boy, appearing in dozens of guises, including as a joker on a playing card, an ice-skating barrel jumper, a totem on a totem pole, a football player, a yogi, a construction worker, King Kong atop the Empire State Building… Neuman signaled the magazine’s editorial attitude, which fell somewhere between juvenile nose-thumbing at contemporary culture and sophisticated spoofing… / Continued at NYTimes

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➢ He was not a warm and fuzzy guy –
David Colker in the LA Times:

The goofy, cartoon face of Alfred E. Neuman looked out from the cover of Mad magazine for decades in various guises, always with the same message: “What, Me Worry?”

“He looked like a boob, but he had a very interesting philosophy,” said Al Feldstein, who as editor built Mad from near-obscurity in the 1950s into a satirical powerhouse, “meaning no matter how bad things get, if you maintain a sense of humor, you can get through it.” Under Feldstein, who edited Mad from 1956 to 1984, the magazine skewered presidents, the Cold War, the tobacco industry, Madison Avenue advertising, Hollywood and numerous other targets. And its legacy from that time lives on.

“Basically, everyone who was young between 1955 and 1975 read Mad,” comedy writer/producer Bill Oakley said in the book The Simpsons: An Uncensored, Unauthorized History. “That’s where your sense of humor came from… / Continued in LA Times

Mad magazine, Alfred E Neuman, Lego issue ➢ Today, Mad is published by DC Entertainment – The latest issue No 526 is the Lego issue (right), after the number one movie in America.

➢ 15 things Mad magazine gave the world:

Comics in the 50s didn’t encourage people to question anything – everything was more about being pleasant and not rocking the boat. Mad came along and started picking holes in the American Dream, suggesting the products Americans were buying were crap, their leaders were clueless and that the people were being treated like dicks. These days everyone’s a cynical bastard, but Mad invented it… / Continued at Anorak online

➢ The UK edition of Mad Magazine, published by Thorpe and Porter, began in 1959 – Over the years there were a number of UK sourced covers and sometimes UK produced interior stories. View a few Mad UK covers from the 1970s with such topics as British Rail, Doctor Who, the Royal Family… even the long-running TV soap opera Coronation Street.

Mad magazine, Alfred E Neuman , comics

Feldstein’s spirit still alive and well in recent issues of Mad

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